How to Design a Fun and Cheerful Bedroom

Designer Melissa Warner Rothblum shares her wisdom for decor that children can grow up with—not out of.

Blue for boys and a set of superhero sheets. Pink for girls, plus a frilly dust ruffle. Such old-fashioned design parameters just won’t cut it for today’s youngsters—or their parents. “Clients are looking at kids’ rooms as an opportunity to do something whimsical and different that they may not wish to do elsewhere in the house,” explains designer Melissa Warner Rothblum of the Los Angeles– and Seattle-based firm Massucco Warner Miller Interior Design. “It’s a safe place to do something fun.” Fun with serious functionality, of course. “Aside from looking great, kids’ rooms have specific requirements when it comes to both visible and hidden storage, as well as an open, comfortable area for play,” says Warner Rothblum, mom to a 2-year-old herself. “Versatility in space planning is also important. For example, making sure there’s room for a desk, even if children are too little for homework now.” Ahead, Warner Rothblum shows how to create environments that are cool, not cutesy, and easily adaptable as kids grow from toddlers to teens.

While the rustic vibe suits a client’s Deer Valley, Utah, vacation home, the industrial feel of the bunk beds and sconces keeps it from veering hokey or juvenile. “I prefer not to do themes or tie decor to a child’s particular interest because that can get dated quite quickly,” Warner Rothblum says. With bold stripes on the textiles and locally sourced touches like the blue-legged bench, this room has a playful appeal that suits the family’s offspring, who range in age from 5 to 13. Light colors contrast against the deep blue walls—a smart paint choice to hide dirt.
Photo: Kimberly Gavin
While the rustic vibe suits a client’s Deer Valley, Utah, vacation home, the industrial feel of the bunk beds and sconces keeps it from veering hokey or juvenile. “I prefer not to do themes or tie decor to a child’s particular interest because that can get dated quite quickly,” Warner Rothblum says. With bold stripes on the textiles and locally sourced touches like the blue-legged bench, this room has a playful appeal that suits the family’s offspring, who range in age from 5 to 13. Light colors contrast against the deep blue walls—a smart paint choice to hide dirt.
Designing for sister-and-brother roomies can be especially tricky. Warner Rothblum kept things classic (and gender-neutral) with simple lines and pale, soothing colors in this Montecito, California, bedroom. At 180 square feet, it’s large enough for two (close quarters can breed bickering, as any parent will tell you), but horizontal stripes help ground the height of the 10-foot ceilings for a cozy feel. Jenny Lind–style beds boast trundles for sleepovers, and the vintage wool rug between them invites kids to sit on the floor and play.
Photo: Grey Crawford
Designing for sister-and-brother roomies can be especially tricky. Warner Rothblum kept things classic (and gender-neutral) with simple lines and pale, soothing colors in this Montecito, California, bedroom. At 180 square feet, it’s large enough for two (close quarters can breed bickering, as any parent will tell you), but horizontal stripes help ground the height of the 10-foot ceilings for a cozy feel. Jenny Lind–style beds boast trundles for sleepovers, and the vintage wool rug between them invites kids to sit on the floor and play.
Though designed for a girl now age 7, this lovely nook with a headboard upholstered in Quadrille fabric could easily see the San Francisco child through adolescence. “The secret is to go classic with the main elements—the bed, seating, etc.—and add personality with art and accessories that can be swapped out over time,” Warner Rothblum explains, noting that the cameo pillows depict the child at the time the room was done. At just 10 feet wide, the space presented a storage challenge that was admirably met with a bed/bookshelf built-in. Special items go on display while deep drawers keep messy stuff like art supplies out of view. The palette sticks to two brights plus white to avoid color overload when dolls, toys, and collections enter the mix.
Photo: David Fenton
Though designed for a girl now age 7, this lovely nook with a headboard upholstered in Quadrille fabric could easily see the San Francisco child through adolescence. “The secret is to go classic with the main elements—the bed, seating, etc.—and add personality with art and accessories that can be swapped out over time,” Warner Rothblum explains, noting that the cameo pillows depict the child at the time the room was done. At just 10 feet wide, the space presented a storage challenge that was admirably met with a bed/bookshelf built-in. Special items go on display while deep drawers keep messy stuff like art supplies out of view. The palette sticks to two brights plus white to avoid color overload when dolls, toys, and collections enter the mix.
Article written by Nina Malkin  and Posted July 18, 2017 on http://www.architecturaldigest.com

Los Angeles to build most expensive stadium complex of the world

(CNN)Los Angeles will welcome the return of NFL football with the construction of a new 80,000-seat stadium complex and “NFL Disney World,” expected to become the world’s most expensive sports arena.The 3.1 million-square-foot multipurpose venue -- located at the site of the closed Hollywood Park Race Track -- will be the league's largest (in square feet).

The 300-acre development in Inglewood, a few miles from downtown Los Angeles, will provide a new home for the NFL’s Rams franchise, whose return to their former home city was approved by league officials last Tuesday. The development has an estimated cost of $2.6 billion — more than $1 billion more than New Jersey’s MetLife Stadium, currently the league’s most costly venue.

The capacity of the new stadium could exceed 100,000 for special events, say developers. Inglewood Mayor James Butts has already announced ambitions to host the Super Bowl at the arena, which developers say will be the “cornerstone” of a year-round sports, music, and entertainment events district.

An unnamed “owner” is reported in the Los Angeles Times comparing their ambitions for the development to Florida’s Disney World theme park. The development’s footprint is about twice the size of the original Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, and will also host a 6,000-seat performance venue, more than 1.5 million square feet of retail and office space, 2,500 homes, a 300-room hotel, and 25 acres of parks.

The Rams, who played in the Los Angeles area for almost 50 years, will give the city its first NFL team since 1995 — the year the Rams left for St. Louis, and the Raiders departed for Oakland.

Rams owner and property developer Stan Kroenke, who has an estimated personal net worth of $7.4 billion, is credited with spearheading the return of NFL football to the country’s second largest city.

The new stadium is expected to be complete in time for the 2019 NFL season, with the team playing at their former home at the L.A. Memorial Coliseum, until then. The team’s owners have begun courting the San Deigo Chargers and Oakland Raiders to join them at the new venue, on the site of the former Hollywood Park horse racing track.

The stadium

The 3.1 million-square-foot multipurpose venue will be the league’s largest (in square feet.)

International architecture giant HKS have been contracted to design the venue and have announced that it will center on a 19-acre transparent canopy, which will cover the entire stadium and parts of the surrounding development.

The canopy will be made from the same transparent ETFE plastic that coats Bayern Munich’s stadium, the Allianz Arena, and the Beijing National Aquatics Center.

Inside the planned arena

Inside the planned arena

Munich’s stadium changes color, from red to white to blue, according to which team — Bayern, second division side TSV 1860 München, or the German national side — is playing at the stadium that day. The architects have not yet said if similar color indication would occur if two or more teams host matches at the new stadium in Inglewood.

The Rams are urging the Chargers, currently based 200 km south of L.A. in San Diego, to join them at the stadium, and fund a portion of the massive costs, with the Oakland Raiders considered a fallback option.

Kroenke has publicly estimated the cost at $1.86 billion, but the Los Angeles Times quotes unnamed “(NFL) officials and owners” who say the true cost could reach $2.66 billion. The New York Times and others have put the value at nearly $3 billion.

The NFL already claims the world’s most expensive stadium. That title belongs to the MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey, home to New York teams the Giants and Jets, which opened in 2010 at a cost of $1.6 billion. The Dallas Cowboys and San Francisco 49ers are also among a minute group of teams worldwide to play in stadiums costing more than $1 billion.

Outside the U.S., stadiums with budgets exceeding $1 billion dollars are rare. London’s home of soccer, Wembley Stadium, crossed the mark in 2007. Tokyo abandoned plans for a $2 billion Zaha Hadid-designed stadium last July amid rising costs, with a cheaper design now underway.

 

Article by By Matthew Ponsford, CNN.com

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Is California’s Wild Housing Market a Sign of a Bubble?

By Graham Wood | Posted Mar 28th 2013 8:00AM

California is the comeback kid of the housing recovery. Though home prices are making annual gains not seen since 2006, The Golden State sticks out as one where they are on a startlingly dramatic swing upward. California prices have posted double-digit hikes on a year-over-year basis for eight consecutive months. In other words, they’re rising fast — very fast.

And now California is sweeping the top cities where home list prices are rising the fastest. Six of the top seven cities — which all saw list prices jump more than 20 percent year-over-year in February — are in California, according to Realtor.com. That’s great, but perhaps a little scary.

As some experts have been warning recently, housing conditions like California’s could be an early sign that we’re headed into another housing bubble. Buyers all over the state are getting into bidding wars, home prices are on a steep incline that some say is unsustainable, and open houses are once again attracting a frenzy of house hunters. This is what we saw in 2005 and 2006. So should California, despite all its encouraging news, be making us worried? Not necessarily.

“It’s important to put these increases [in home prices] into perspective,” said Errol Samuelson, president of Realtor.com. “Despite these gains, home prices nationally in January were still 21.4 percent lower than they were at the peak of the housing boom in June 2006. In California, the losses were much worse. Homeowners lost more than half the value of their homes when prices fell. Today, California prices are still 34.8 percent below the peak level. California prices haven’t even recovered half of what was lost.”

There’s another reason today’s sharp increase in prices differs from the days of the housing bubble: There are real fundamentals behind them. It’s not pure speculation. Jed Kolko, Trulia’s chief economist, noted that solid job growth in California’s coastal areas are putting more buyers in the market, allowing sellers to raise prices because of demand. At the same time, housing inventory is lower than it has been in a decade, another element that typically drives prices higher. (But that should ease as more homeowners become confident about trying their hand at selling.) Plus, Samuelson added, government regulations are preventing another housing boom based on unqualified buyers being able to snag mortgages that they couldn’t afford in the first place.

So for now, what’s happening is just a strong recovery, not a bubble. Still, it is rather surprising how fast prices are bouncing back in California. Click through the gallery below to see the seven cities where list prices are rising the fastest.

California - Marco Rufo

How to Design a Fun and Cheerful Bedroom

Designer Melissa Warner Rothblum shares her wisdom for decor that children can grow up with—not out of.

Blue for boys and a set of superhero sheets. Pink for girls, plus a frilly dust ruffle. Such old-fashioned design parameters just won’t cut it for today’s youngsters—or their parents. “Clients are looking at kids’ rooms as an opportunity to do something whimsical and different that they may not wish to do elsewhere in the house,” explains designer Melissa Warner Rothblum of the Los Angeles– and Seattle-based firm Massucco Warner Miller Interior Design. “It’s a safe place to do something fun.” Fun with serious functionality, of course. “Aside from looking great, kids’ rooms have specific requirements when it comes to both visible and hidden storage, as well as an open, comfortable area for play,” says Warner Rothblum, mom to a 2-year-old herself. “Versatility in space planning is also important. For example, making sure there’s room for a desk, even if children are too little for homework now.” Ahead, Warner Rothblum shows how to create environments that are cool, not cutesy, and easily adaptable as kids grow from toddlers to teens.

While the rustic vibe suits a client’s Deer Valley, Utah, vacation home, the industrial feel of the bunk beds and sconces keeps it from veering hokey or juvenile. “I prefer not to do themes or tie decor to a child’s particular interest because that can get dated quite quickly,” Warner Rothblum says. With bold stripes on the textiles and locally sourced touches like the blue-legged bench, this room has a playful appeal that suits the family’s offspring, who range in age from 5 to 13. Light colors contrast against the deep blue walls—a smart paint choice to hide dirt.
Photo: Kimberly Gavin
While the rustic vibe suits a client’s Deer Valley, Utah, vacation home, the industrial feel of the bunk beds and sconces keeps it from veering hokey or juvenile. “I prefer not to do themes or tie decor to a child’s particular interest because that can get dated quite quickly,” Warner Rothblum says. With bold stripes on the textiles and locally sourced touches like the blue-legged bench, this room has a playful appeal that suits the family’s offspring, who range in age from 5 to 13. Light colors contrast against the deep blue walls—a smart paint choice to hide dirt.
Designing for sister-and-brother roomies can be especially tricky. Warner Rothblum kept things classic (and gender-neutral) with simple lines and pale, soothing colors in this Montecito, California, bedroom. At 180 square feet, it’s large enough for two (close quarters can breed bickering, as any parent will tell you), but horizontal stripes help ground the height of the 10-foot ceilings for a cozy feel. Jenny Lind–style beds boast trundles for sleepovers, and the vintage wool rug between them invites kids to sit on the floor and play.
Photo: Grey Crawford
Designing for sister-and-brother roomies can be especially tricky. Warner Rothblum kept things classic (and gender-neutral) with simple lines and pale, soothing colors in this Montecito, California, bedroom. At 180 square feet, it’s large enough for two (close quarters can breed bickering, as any parent will tell you), but horizontal stripes help ground the height of the 10-foot ceilings for a cozy feel. Jenny Lind–style beds boast trundles for sleepovers, and the vintage wool rug between them invites kids to sit on the floor and play.
Though designed for a girl now age 7, this lovely nook with a headboard upholstered in Quadrille fabric could easily see the San Francisco child through adolescence. “The secret is to go classic with the main elements—the bed, seating, etc.—and add personality with art and accessories that can be swapped out over time,” Warner Rothblum explains, noting that the cameo pillows depict the child at the time the room was done. At just 10 feet wide, the space presented a storage challenge that was admirably met with a bed/bookshelf built-in. Special items go on display while deep drawers keep messy stuff like art supplies out of view. The palette sticks to two brights plus white to avoid color overload when dolls, toys, and collections enter the mix.
Photo: David Fenton
Though designed for a girl now age 7, this lovely nook with a headboard upholstered in Quadrille fabric could easily see the San Francisco child through adolescence. “The secret is to go classic with the main elements—the bed, seating, etc.—and add personality with art and accessories that can be swapped out over time,” Warner Rothblum explains, noting that the cameo pillows depict the child at the time the room was done. At just 10 feet wide, the space presented a storage challenge that was admirably met with a bed/bookshelf built-in. Special items go on display while deep drawers keep messy stuff like art supplies out of view. The palette sticks to two brights plus white to avoid color overload when dolls, toys, and collections enter the mix.
Article written by Nina Malkin  and Posted July 18, 2017 on http://www.architecturaldigest.com

Los Angeles to build most expensive stadium complex of the world

(CNN)Los Angeles will welcome the return of NFL football with the construction of a new 80,000-seat stadium complex and “NFL Disney World,” expected to become the world’s most expensive sports arena.The 3.1 million-square-foot multipurpose venue -- located at the site of the closed Hollywood Park Race Track -- will be the league's largest (in square feet).

The 300-acre development in Inglewood, a few miles from downtown Los Angeles, will provide a new home for the NFL’s Rams franchise, whose return to their former home city was approved by league officials last Tuesday. The development has an estimated cost of $2.6 billion — more than $1 billion more than New Jersey’s MetLife Stadium, currently the league’s most costly venue.

The capacity of the new stadium could exceed 100,000 for special events, say developers. Inglewood Mayor James Butts has already announced ambitions to host the Super Bowl at the arena, which developers say will be the “cornerstone” of a year-round sports, music, and entertainment events district.

An unnamed “owner” is reported in the Los Angeles Times comparing their ambitions for the development to Florida’s Disney World theme park. The development’s footprint is about twice the size of the original Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, and will also host a 6,000-seat performance venue, more than 1.5 million square feet of retail and office space, 2,500 homes, a 300-room hotel, and 25 acres of parks.

The Rams, who played in the Los Angeles area for almost 50 years, will give the city its first NFL team since 1995 — the year the Rams left for St. Louis, and the Raiders departed for Oakland.

Rams owner and property developer Stan Kroenke, who has an estimated personal net worth of $7.4 billion, is credited with spearheading the return of NFL football to the country’s second largest city.

The new stadium is expected to be complete in time for the 2019 NFL season, with the team playing at their former home at the L.A. Memorial Coliseum, until then. The team’s owners have begun courting the San Deigo Chargers and Oakland Raiders to join them at the new venue, on the site of the former Hollywood Park horse racing track.

The stadium

The 3.1 million-square-foot multipurpose venue will be the league’s largest (in square feet.)

International architecture giant HKS have been contracted to design the venue and have announced that it will center on a 19-acre transparent canopy, which will cover the entire stadium and parts of the surrounding development.

The canopy will be made from the same transparent ETFE plastic that coats Bayern Munich’s stadium, the Allianz Arena, and the Beijing National Aquatics Center.

Inside the planned arena

Inside the planned arena

Munich’s stadium changes color, from red to white to blue, according to which team — Bayern, second division side TSV 1860 München, or the German national side — is playing at the stadium that day. The architects have not yet said if similar color indication would occur if two or more teams host matches at the new stadium in Inglewood.

The Rams are urging the Chargers, currently based 200 km south of L.A. in San Diego, to join them at the stadium, and fund a portion of the massive costs, with the Oakland Raiders considered a fallback option.

Kroenke has publicly estimated the cost at $1.86 billion, but the Los Angeles Times quotes unnamed “(NFL) officials and owners” who say the true cost could reach $2.66 billion. The New York Times and others have put the value at nearly $3 billion.

The NFL already claims the world’s most expensive stadium. That title belongs to the MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey, home to New York teams the Giants and Jets, which opened in 2010 at a cost of $1.6 billion. The Dallas Cowboys and San Francisco 49ers are also among a minute group of teams worldwide to play in stadiums costing more than $1 billion.

Outside the U.S., stadiums with budgets exceeding $1 billion dollars are rare. London’s home of soccer, Wembley Stadium, crossed the mark in 2007. Tokyo abandoned plans for a $2 billion Zaha Hadid-designed stadium last July amid rising costs, with a cheaper design now underway.

 

Article by By Matthew Ponsford, CNN.com

27401 Las Flores Mesa Drive

Property Type: Land

Over 10 acres of land in one of the most exclusive areas of Malibu provide...
view details