Could LA’s lack of land be holding its economy back?

Article found on TheRealDeal.com on 08/31/2018

A lack of developable land could be holding back the economy in Los Angeles.

That’s according to one Bloomberg columnist, who says that Southern California’s issues with supply could be contributing to its recent slowdown in job growth.

The L.A. Metro, which encompasses L.A. and Orange counties, posted a job growth of 1.1 percent over the 12 months ended in July, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That’s lower than the national average, at 1.6 percent, and other major metropolitan areas, including Chicago, New York and Miami.

Yet jobs in L.A. have actually been growing rapidly in the last decade, and surpassed the national average in 2010 for the first time in three decades. That could mean that housing affordability — a more recent economic issue — could be playing a role in the sluggish job growth.

In July, a National Association of Realtors survey ranked L.A. as the least affordable place in the entire country. A typical household in L.A. can barely afford to buy four percent of the homes listed for sale, according to the study.

L.A.’s increasing unaffordability — more than 17 percent of homes are valued above $1 million — could be keeping workers away from the city, driving them to other more affordable cities in the state, or out of California altogether. A severe housing shortage, driven by a lack of developable land, has been a key reason for the price hikes.

Other metro areas in California picked up most of the slack, bumping up the statewide figure to 2 percent. Both the Riverside – San Bernardino and San Jose metros posted job growth upwards of 3.2 percent, surpassing major job hubs like San Francisco and San Diego.

San Francisco, with 1.6 percent in growth, ranked ninth out of the 12 biggest metropolitan areas. San Diego, meanwhile, trailed with 1.5 percent growth. [Bloomberg] – Natalie Hoberman

How to Design a Fun and Cheerful Bedroom

Designer Melissa Warner Rothblum shares her wisdom for decor that children can grow up with—not out of.

Blue for boys and a set of superhero sheets. Pink for girls, plus a frilly dust ruffle. Such old-fashioned design parameters just won’t cut it for today’s youngsters—or their parents. “Clients are looking at kids’ rooms as an opportunity to do something whimsical and different that they may not wish to do elsewhere in the house,” explains designer Melissa Warner Rothblum of the Los Angeles– and Seattle-based firm Massucco Warner Miller Interior Design. “It’s a safe place to do something fun.” Fun with serious functionality, of course. “Aside from looking great, kids’ rooms have specific requirements when it comes to both visible and hidden storage, as well as an open, comfortable area for play,” says Warner Rothblum, mom to a 2-year-old herself. “Versatility in space planning is also important. For example, making sure there’s room for a desk, even if children are too little for homework now.” Ahead, Warner Rothblum shows how to create environments that are cool, not cutesy, and easily adaptable as kids grow from toddlers to teens.

While the rustic vibe suits a client’s Deer Valley, Utah, vacation home, the industrial feel of the bunk beds and sconces keeps it from veering hokey or juvenile. “I prefer not to do themes or tie decor to a child’s particular interest because that can get dated quite quickly,” Warner Rothblum says. With bold stripes on the textiles and locally sourced touches like the blue-legged bench, this room has a playful appeal that suits the family’s offspring, who range in age from 5 to 13. Light colors contrast against the deep blue walls—a smart paint choice to hide dirt.
Photo: Kimberly Gavin
While the rustic vibe suits a client’s Deer Valley, Utah, vacation home, the industrial feel of the bunk beds and sconces keeps it from veering hokey or juvenile. “I prefer not to do themes or tie decor to a child’s particular interest because that can get dated quite quickly,” Warner Rothblum says. With bold stripes on the textiles and locally sourced touches like the blue-legged bench, this room has a playful appeal that suits the family’s offspring, who range in age from 5 to 13. Light colors contrast against the deep blue walls—a smart paint choice to hide dirt.
Designing for sister-and-brother roomies can be especially tricky. Warner Rothblum kept things classic (and gender-neutral) with simple lines and pale, soothing colors in this Montecito, California, bedroom. At 180 square feet, it’s large enough for two (close quarters can breed bickering, as any parent will tell you), but horizontal stripes help ground the height of the 10-foot ceilings for a cozy feel. Jenny Lind–style beds boast trundles for sleepovers, and the vintage wool rug between them invites kids to sit on the floor and play.
Photo: Grey Crawford
Designing for sister-and-brother roomies can be especially tricky. Warner Rothblum kept things classic (and gender-neutral) with simple lines and pale, soothing colors in this Montecito, California, bedroom. At 180 square feet, it’s large enough for two (close quarters can breed bickering, as any parent will tell you), but horizontal stripes help ground the height of the 10-foot ceilings for a cozy feel. Jenny Lind–style beds boast trundles for sleepovers, and the vintage wool rug between them invites kids to sit on the floor and play.
Though designed for a girl now age 7, this lovely nook with a headboard upholstered in Quadrille fabric could easily see the San Francisco child through adolescence. “The secret is to go classic with the main elements—the bed, seating, etc.—and add personality with art and accessories that can be swapped out over time,” Warner Rothblum explains, noting that the cameo pillows depict the child at the time the room was done. At just 10 feet wide, the space presented a storage challenge that was admirably met with a bed/bookshelf built-in. Special items go on display while deep drawers keep messy stuff like art supplies out of view. The palette sticks to two brights plus white to avoid color overload when dolls, toys, and collections enter the mix.
Photo: David Fenton
Though designed for a girl now age 7, this lovely nook with a headboard upholstered in Quadrille fabric could easily see the San Francisco child through adolescence. “The secret is to go classic with the main elements—the bed, seating, etc.—and add personality with art and accessories that can be swapped out over time,” Warner Rothblum explains, noting that the cameo pillows depict the child at the time the room was done. At just 10 feet wide, the space presented a storage challenge that was admirably met with a bed/bookshelf built-in. Special items go on display while deep drawers keep messy stuff like art supplies out of view. The palette sticks to two brights plus white to avoid color overload when dolls, toys, and collections enter the mix.
Article written by Nina Malkin  and Posted July 18, 2017 on http://www.architecturaldigest.com

Should You Invest In Los Angeles Real Estate?

Quick Hits: If you’re planning to buy a home, do it now, because prices are going up for the next few years. Investments in single-family rental properties have weak potential because of high home prices. Apartment developments have the best potential in LA County. Mortgages have higher risk even though prices are rising. Best bets for investments in retail or restaurants are in Riverside County.

The LA economy is different than it was. In the last twenty years it’s lost a half million manufacturing jobs, many in the aircraft business. Tourism picked up some of the slack but at lower pay, and many jobs now revolve around services to the a population of 17 million that’s increasing very slowly. Healthcare is the fastest growing industry. The demographics are different too; 48 percent of residents in LA County are Latino, 14 percent Asian, a third are immigrants.

 

Getty

The population isn’t growing very fast, but home prices are – that’s partly because LA is running out of room. Growth is mainly in the cheaper, outer communities in Riverside and San Bernardino. Home prices were up 30 percent in the last three years – although it’s difficult to separate real home sales from the boom in foreclosed subprime properties. Whatever the cause, you can expect prices to go higher in the next few years, so don’t wait if you plan to buy. In LA County, prices are up the most in West Hollywood, the least in Torrance.

Home prices are high compared to rents, except in Riverside-San Bernardino, which makes single-family rentals a difficult investment except in special circumstances. Overall, high home prices force the majority of people to rent, and rents are high compared to incomes. This makes apartment buildings a good investment – at the right price – and encourages investors to cut single-family homes into multiple rental units. LA County, with the highest percent of renters, has the best investment potential, Riverside the lowest.

Mortgages are a difficult investment right now. Because home prices will keep rising the next few years, the equity cushion for new mortgages will grow quickly; on the other hand, prices are already too high, which means these mortgages will have a rising risk of default. Just because the last bust is over doesn’t mean a new one isn’t around the corner . Lenders should back away from high loan-to-value mortgages during this period. The same is true for construction loans; new projects should be financed in very careful stages.

 

Article posted on www.forbes.com on June 21st.

2016 interior design update: Top trends in tiles

National Tiles lists out the Top Trends in tiling for 2016, especially for the benefit of those working on interior design and renovation jobs.

1. Rustic Chic 

Best expressed through exposed brick wall designs, Rustic Chic will continue to be popular for living spaces, bedrooms and even bathrooms in 2016. Brick look tiles can be used instead of real bricks to create a stylish loft-inspired environment, or elements representing country living can be incorporated within the home or workplace. National Tiles’ Chicago Brick range is a rustic European tile that can be used to achieve this look.

2. A Touch of Luxury

Classic and luxurious will be a key trend in 2016 for bathroom and kitchen renovations to achieve a timeless vibe. National Tiles’ Moroccan Lantern range renders an old world charm and sophistication – add accessories and furnishings complementing this elegant style to continue the luxurious theme.

3. Sophisticated Scales

An increasingly popular range due to their unique shape and dramatic charm, fish scale tiles can fill any space from kitchens to bathrooms and restaurant bars. Particularly suitable for bathrooms, or to enhance water features due to their whimsical mermaid-style scales, National Tiles’ Fan Tiles are a sophisticated scale-inspired range suitable for wall applications.

4. Stay Glossy

Traditional white gloss rectangular tiles are a classic favourite for their clean, simple and neutral vibe. A simple white gloss tile can enhance the space with a feature colour that complements the decor theme. A glossy finish is also a great choice when tiling the kitchen, bathroom or laundry for both added style and ease of cleaning.

5. Embrace Patterns

Patterned tiles are set to take over floors and walls in a big way during 2016, particularly styles such as National Tiles’ Exagon and Modena ranges. Patterned tiles are a great way to bring life to smaller spaces, whether it’s a bathroom feature wall, kitchen splashback or flooring in wet areas.

6. Terrific Timber

Timber look tiles will continue to be a crowd favourite as an alternative to wooden floors for their ability to bring warmth to a space without the hassles of maintenance associated with real timber floors. Timber look tiles can also be applied to walls to achieve a luxurious yet rustic environment – particularly in bathrooms, bedrooms, living rooms and laundries. National Tiles’ natural Taiga tile range has a linear chromatic design that evokes an unspoiled natural setting in any contemporary interior.

7. Splash Some Colour

This year’s trends also indicate a preference for bright colours over neutral shades. Bright coloured tiles are going to be popular for kitchen splashbacks or feature walls in 2016. One can simply choose a single bright colour, or mosaic a selection of colours for greater impact, with National Tiles offering endless tile colours to suit specific tastes and budgets.

8. Get Geometric

Used for centuries to enhance the mood, tone and texture of a living space, geometric shapes and patterns such as those from National Tiles’ Teakwood hexagon mosaic tiles are available in a stone finish and are suitable for creating a subtle or bold feature within a room. A geometric tile is a contemporary design element inspired by European bathroom styles.

9. Classic Marble 

Marble inspired accents to achieve high-end design outcomes on a budget will be a popular trend in 2016. A marble feature wall is a stunning way to bring class and sophistication into the home without the hefty price tag of actual marble. National Tiles’ Carrara White Marble Hexagon Mosaics are a great way to achieve a beautiful natural feature in new builds or renovations.

Image: Timber look tiles will continue to be a crowd favourite as an alternative to wooden floors

 

Article Ported on May 1st on architectureanddesign.com

Is L.A.’s housing market really as unaffordable as it seems?

The average asking price for a home in some of Los Angeles’ most recognizable communities ranges from $269 per square foot in Boyle Heights to $1,118 per square foot in Malibu.

Based on these averages, one might reasonably expect that a 1,000-square-foot residence in Boyle Heights would cost about $269,000, while a similarly sized one in Malibu would go for $1,118,000. If you’re a prospective home buyer looking for affordable housing, it would seem reasonable, staring at these numbers, to steer as far clear of Malibu as possible in your search.

But is that the right approach?

We often hear about how unaffordable the L.A. housing market is. When we look at the average cost of a home in an area like Venice, the Southland’s reputation for being hopelessly unaffordable certainly appears justified. Stories of bidding wars pushing up prices in once-affordable neighborhoods like Highland Park often discourage prospective buyers from even trying to purchase a home.

More from Livable City>>

The reality, however, is that while many neighborhoods may seem out of reach based on price averages, those numbers don’t tell the whole story. The range of prices behind these averages can vary significantly — meaning affordable properties are available in areas where many might never think to look.

Los Angeles housing price ranges by neighborhood as compiled by real estate data provider NeighborhoodX.
Los Angeles housing price ranges by neighborhood as compiled by real estate data provider NeighborhoodX. (NeighborhoodX)

For example, while Boyle Heights has the lowest average asking price of the areas we analyzed, the prices within the neighborhood range significantly from $188 per square foot to $524 per square foot. On a per-square-foot basis, the most expensive listing in Boyle Heights is pricier than the most affordable properties in Beverly Hills ($474), Bel Air ($403) and Santa Monica ($423).

Conversely, there are neighborhoods where the average listing price is more expensive than that of Boyle Heights, but with a greater price range. In other words, these neighborhoods have properties than are more affordable than the lowest priced properties in Boyle Heights. Deals can be found in Mount Washington (as low as $155 per square foot), El Sereno ($163), East Los Angeles ($173) and Hollywood ($186) that are all cheaper than the lowest priced property in Boyle Heights ($188).

This holds true for the upper end of the Los Angeles neighborhoods, too.

For example, while the average listing price in Beverly Hills is $1,089 per square foot, it ranges from $474 to $3,206. To put this in context, the most affordable listing in Beverly Hills ($474) is less expensive than the average listing in Eagle Rock ($499). Similarly, the most expensive listing in Los Feliz ($1,030) is still more affordable than the average listing in Bel Air ($1,080).

In short, while data can help in the search for a residence or investment property, the right kind of data is even more useful. At any time, neighborhood averages can be skewed higher by new development or lower by foreclosures — and this can steer buyers away from certain neighborhoods.

Instead of simply flooding a neighborhood like Boyle Heights because it appears to be the most reasonably priced — and in doing so helping to create bidding wars — Angelenos might be better served by expanding their searches beyond what might appear to be possible at first glance.

Looking at the range behind the neighborhood averages can help buyers recognize that there are often some relative bargains even in some of Los Angeles’ most affluent neighborhoods.

Article by : Constantine A. Valhouli published in the LA times on May 5th 2016

Floating Villa in Dubai

You Could Own a Floating Villa in Dubai for $2.7 Million

 

Located 2.5 miles off Dubai’s coast, the homes will feature breathtaking views of marine life in the Persian Gulf

Nick Mafi
Kleindienst Group

Posted March 21, 2016 on Architectural Digest

A rendering shows all three levels of one of Dubai’s new Floating Seahorse villas.
A rendering shows all three levels of one of Dubai’s new Floating Seahorse villas.

For years, Dubai has been known as a playground for extreme urban design. From Ski Dubai, the city’s massive indoor ski slope, to the towering Burj Khalifa, daring architecture seems limitless in the United Arab Emirates’ capital city. Soon, Dubai will be adding yet another innovative wonder to its roster: the Floating Seahorse villas, located roughly two and a half miles off the coast in the waters of the Persian Gulf. Spearheaded by the design firm Kleindienst Group, the units have a current asking price of $2.7 million. The floating homes will consist of three levels—the main floor at sea level, an upper deck, and a lower level completely submerged in water. The main floor, which includes an outdoor shower, a kitchenette, and glass-bottomed jacuzzi, will be ideal for entertaining. The lower, underwater level houses a master bedroom and bathroom with floor-to-ceiling windows for breathtaking views of marine life.

Each floating villa will also feature a man-made coral garden, spanning 495 square feet, that’s connected to the underwater level. “We will create an artificial coral reef beneath the luxury retreats,” said CEO Josef Kleindienst about the design element that gave the complex its name in a statement. “It will be a protected area in which seahorses can safely live and breed.”

floating-seahorse-dubais-aquatic-holiday-home-02.jpg
The master bedroom will have views of the adjoining coral garden.

The first phase of the Floating Seahorse villas should be completed by late 2016 and ready to use. The aquatic homes have been designed for vacations, not permanent residence, as they are only accessible by sea or air.

floating-seahorse-dubais-aquatic-holiday-home-03.jpg

A view from the main room, at sea level, looking out toward Dubai.

Onetime home of Benny Goodman, the King of Swing…

A former home of legendary jazz musician and “King of Swing” bandleader Benny Goodman has sold in Pacific Palisades for $5.85 million.

Found along a tree-lined street in Palisades Riviera, the Spanish-style house retains its 1920s charm with beamed ceilings, original windows, wood-burning fireplaces and wrought iron details.

The roughly 5,000-square-foot house opens to a rotunda entry with a saltillo tile floors and a sweeping staircase embellished with decorative tile risers. Living, dining and family rooms, an updated kitchen and a study/office are among the common spaces.

Five bedrooms and 5.5 bathrooms include a master suite with a walk-in closet and heated bathroom floors. A detached guest house is set up as a music/recording studio.

Grounds of about a third of an acre contain multiple patios, a built-in barbecue and a swimming pool and spa. Privacy hedges, formal landscaping and front and back lawns complete the setting.

The property came to market in summer for $6.195 million and was more recently listed at $5.995 million. It previously sold a decade ago for $4.65 million, records show.

Anthony Marguleas of Amalfi Estates was the listing agent. Marco Rufo of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices repped the buyer.

Goodman, who died in 1986 at 77, was a clarinetist and dance band leader in the 1930s. His noted hits include “Sing Sing Sing,” “Taking a Chance on Love” and “Let’s Dance.”

Article by Neil J Leitereg in LATIMES.com

A match made in heaven: What’s trending in homes

 

Design trends we're in love with

Our agents are committed to finding a home for their buyers that makes their heart skip a beat, a home that they immediately can picture themselves spending the rest of their lives in. We asked Marco Rufo, an agent with our Pacific Palisades office, for his input on what he thinks it takes for a home to make a buyer fall in love.

The way to the heart starts with the kitchen

“If a buyer is looking for a traditional style home, they are almost always looking for stainless steel appliances in the kitchen, and I get a lot of requests about the Viking brand. On the other hand, modern and contemporary-style homes almost usually have all black, modern appliances. In these homes, I see a lot of Wolf appliances.”

Setting the mood

Though appliances are important, Marco tells us that countertops are really what set the mood. Granite is and has been on the list of must-haves for many homebuyers, but engineered-stone products primarily made of quartz are beginning to replace granite in high-end homes.

Looking for…

If homebuyers had a dating profile, their ideal kitchen would have:

  • 48-inch stove
  • 48-inch refrigerator
  • Two dishwashers
  • Two sinks
  • Pot filler
  • Espresso maker
  • Microwaves

Upgrades that will make you fall in love

For the ladies: A large center island in the kitchen.

For the fellas: Full audio and lighting control system in the house.

Whether you are selling, buying, or are currently a homeowner, these are two features that homeowners these days are searching for.

Long-term commitments

“There are some features that just won’t go out of style–and for good reason. If you are a homeowner, I suggest making sure that your home has several, if not all of these features.”

  • Eat-in kitchen
  • Stainless steel appliances
  • En-suite master bath
  • Hardwood floors
  • Large master bedroom
  • Outdoor pool

In love with the layout

“Open floor plans are very popular right now. We see it specifically in the kitchen and great room, even opening up the eat-in breakfast area. This allows for more socializing, and is great for hosting dinner parties or having family over.”

Marco also says that two-story homes are more desirable, due to the amount of bedrooms they can have. “Large families gravitate to two-story homes because it’s double the space. Additionally, when you live in Southern California, you are bound to have friends and family wanting to come stay with you, so having that extra level and extra rooms can be a lifesaver.”

A perfect match in Southern California

Backyards are a must in Southern California, but Marco advises to make sure that a few things always pair up:

  • Homes with a pool are more desirable if they also have a spa.
  • When considering your outdoor landscaping, real grass is still ideal, however turf is being used more often. Backyards with lush landscaping and accent lights are also sure to catch any buyer’s eye.
  • An outdoor barbecue station is always a good idea, but make sure that you also have a large countertop and space for stools.

Rufo%2C Marco_2011-08-02

Meet Marco Rufo

Office: Pacific Palisades

Ideal home features: A home with a grand entrance and open floor plan with an East Coast traditional style.

Why Marco loves working in real estate with Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties: He loves the agent and broker network, the accessibility, and the brand and image that the company have.

 

Posted on http://blog.bhhscalifornia.com on February 10th

 

6 Reasons You Should Never Buy or Sell a Home Without an Agent

It’s a slow Sunday morning. You’ve just brewed your Nespresso and popped open your laptop to check out the latest home listings before you hit the road for a day of open houses.

You’re DIYing this real estate thing, and you think you’re doing pretty well—after all, any info you might need is at your fingertips online, right? That and your own sterling judgment.

Oh, dear home buyer (or seller!)—we know you can do it on your own. But you really, really shouldn’t. This is likely the biggest financial decision of your entire life, and you need a Realtor® if you want to do it right. Here’s why.

1. They have loads of expertise

Want to check the MLS for a 4B/2B with an EIK and a W/D? Real estate has its own language, full of acronyms and semi-arcane jargon, and your Realtor is trained to speak that language fluently.

Plus, buying or selling a home usually requires dozens of forms, reports, disclosures, and other technical documents. Realtors have the expertise to help you prepare a killer deal—while avoiding delays or costly mistakes that can seriously mess you up.

2. They have turbocharged searching power

The Internet is awesome. You can find almost anything—anything! And with online real estate listing sites such as yours truly, you can find up-to-date home listings on your own, any time you want. But guess what? Realtors have access to even more listings. Sometimes properties are available but not actively advertised. A Realtor can help you find those hidden gems.

Plus, a good local Realtor is going to know the search area way better than you ever could. Have your eye on a particular neighborhood, but it’s just out of your price range? Your Realtor is equipped to know the ins and outs of every neighborhood, so she can direct you toward a home in your price range that you may have overlooked.

3. They have bullish negotiating chops

Any time you buy or sell a home, you’re going to encounter negotiations—and as today’s housing market heats up, those negotiations are more likely than ever to get a little heated.

You can expect lots of competition, cutthroat tactics, all-cash offers, and bidding wars. Don’t you want a savvy and professional negotiator on your side to seal the best deal for you?

And it’s not just about how much money you end up spending or netting. A Realtor will help draw up a purchase agreement that allows enough time for inspections, contingencies, and anything else that’s crucial to your particular needs.

4. They’re connected to everyone

Realtors might not know everything, but they make it their mission to know just about everyone who can possibly help in the process of buying or selling a home. Mortgage brokers, real estate attorneys, home inspectors, home stagers, interior designers—the list goes on—and they’re all in your Realtor’s network. Use them.

5. They adhere to a strict code of ethics

Not every real estate agent is a Realtor, who is a licensed real estate salesperson who belongs to the National Association of Realtors®, the largest trade group in the country.

What difference does it make? Realtors are held to a higher ethical standard than licensed agents and must adhere to a Code of Ethics.

6. They’re your sage parent/data analyst/therapist—all rolled into one

The thing about Realtors: They wear a lot of different hats. Sure, they’re salespeople, but they actually do a whole heck of a lot to earn their commission. They’re constantly driving around, checking out listings for you. They spend their own money on marketing your home (if you’re selling). They’re researching comps to make sure you’re getting the best deal.

And, of course, they’re working for you at nearly all hours of the day and night—whether you need more info on a home or just someone to talk to in order to feel at ease with the offer you just put in. This is the biggest financial (and possibly emotional) decision of your life, and guiding you through it isn’t a responsibility Realtors take lightly.

 

Article by Rachel Stults in Realtor.com on 02/04/16

Light Bridge to break ground in Los Angeles

Work starts this week on a huge bridge made up of 10 pairs of arches, designed by architect Michael Maltzan to replace the iconic Art-Deco Sixth Street Viaduct in Los Angeles (+ slideshow).

Ribbon of Light bridge by Michael Maltzan

Called the Ribbon of Light, the 3,500-foot-long (approximately 1,100 metres) bridge will span the Los Angeles River and several busy roads, providing pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular access to downtown LA from the Boyle Heights neighbourhood.

Demolition will begin on the existing bridge on 5 February, necessitating a 40-hour closure of the 101 Freeway.

Ribbon of Light bridge by Michael Maltzan

The new elevated structure will feature a series of splayed arched trusses that will be illuminated at night. It will connect to a network of parks being developed alongside and underneath it.

Five staircases will allow pedestrians access at different points along the span, while a ramp at either end will provide accessibility for cyclists.

Ribbon of Light bridge by Michael Maltzan

“The new Los Angeles Sixth Street Viaduct is a transformative infrastructure project for the city of Los Angeles,” said LA-based Michael Maltzan Architecture, describing it as “more than a simple replacement thoroughfare”.

 

“The project foresees a multimodal future for the city, one that accommodates cars, incorporates significant new bicycle connections, and also increases connectivity for pedestrians to access the viaduct, not only at its endpoints, but along the entirety of the viaduct, linking the bridge, the Los Angeles River, and future urban landscapes in a more meaningful relationship,” it said.

Ribbon of Light bridge by Michael Maltzan

The existing Sixth Street Viaduct dates back to 1932 and has been featured in numerous films, particularly those revealing the city’s underside, including Drive, The Dark Knight Rises, and To Live and Die in LA.

Ribbon of Light bridge by Michael Maltzan

Though the old Art-Deco bridge is a landmark, it has badly deteriorated due to a chemical reaction known as Alkali Scilica Reaction, which is eroding its concrete piers. It also fails to meet current seismic standards.

Ribbon of Light bridge by Michael Maltzan

Maltzan’s firm designed the replacement bridge with architecture and engineering firm HNTB and engineering company Skanska.

“These pairs of repeated concrete arches and cable-supported roadway deck are simultaneously elegant and efficient,” Michael Maltzan Architecture said.

Ribbon of Light bridge by Michael Maltzan
A model of Michael Maltzan’s replacement for the iconic Art-Deco Sixth Street Viaduct in Los Angeles

“The design approach unifies and optimises the architecture of the viaduct through repetition, creating a unique configuration through the repeated use of arches, roadway and pier forms: an iconic structure,” the firm added.

The LA River is currently a concrete channel, but is in the process of being redesigned with more natural edges as a park and recreation area, with Frank Gehry currently attached to the design team.

Ribbon of Light bridge by Michael Maltzan
The model shows the splayed arched trusses and the space underneath them, which will be filled by a network of parks

The Ribbon of Light is the latest in a string of major building projects in LA, helping to turn the city into a hotbed for design. Other examples include The Broad by Diller Scofidio + Renfro and the renovated Petersen Automotive Museum.

“The unwieldiness, the heterogeneity, the complexity here – all those things you might associate with dystopic urbanisms have made things like invention very possible. They’ve created a very open context,” Maltzan told Dezeen.